There’s a lot of love here peeps

Disclaimer – This is an extremely sycophantic blog post (something that is very rare from me). Only read it if you are in a good mood, otherwise it might lead to nausea.

Being the photographer at Blogstock, the world’s first blogging festival just on the outskirts of London, I didn’t have much opportunity to listen to any of the talks or seminars.

Instead, I flitted from tent to tent to tent, picking up and collecting the beginning of presentations and the end of sentences.

Because of that, it’s safe to say I didn’t learn anything from the speakers (though I’m sure I would have if I actually stood still and listened for five minutes).

However, there was still one thing I learned at Blogstock.

The one thing I learned at Blogstock

What I love about photography is it really keeps you in the moment and it forces to socialise with people, both old and new.

I’ve been going to Travel Massive (a social event for travel bloggers in London) for over two years now, and Traverse (a UK bloggers conference) since its inception, and the one thing that’s always struck me is how tight the travel blogging community is. In such a competitive industry where everyone’s shouting to get themselves heard people still have a lot of time for each other, and I find that incredibly refreshing. I guess that’s because we all have so much in common.

At Blogstock it was great to see all those communities come together – family, fashion, food and travel – and it was great to see that it’s not just the travel blogging community that’s tight, but all the blogging communities. There’s a lot of love here peeps.

At Blogstock it was great to see a number of blogging communities together

Speaking to people from different industries, I loved how passionate everyone was, how much they cared about what they were doing. Everyone truly believed they could make a difference.

Personally, I think when people start transcending their community that they’re in and start working with others that amazing things can happen. A perfect example of this is food and travel; as many bloggers know they’ve always gone hand-in-hand. If a food blogger and a travel blogger joined together then they’d cover off two industries, and the sum of their parts would be bigger than they would be individually.

There’s a lot going on in the online world at the moment, and I think there could be some very interesting collaborations out there if people are willing to do so (which I might add is exactly what we’re doing with A Brit and A Broad).

There’s a lot going on in the online world at the moment, and I think there could be some very interesting collaborations out there if people are willing to do so

One of the things people always say when they leave an event such as Blogstock is how energised they feel, how they’re ready to dive back into blogging feeling more focused than ever before.

It always helps with a fair few beers, but I love the discussions about blogging and the future of blogging at the end of the day. For me, I find this as informative as any talk, and some people like Neil Barnes (aka Backpacks and Bedbunks) and Paul Dow (aka TravMonkey) are starting to do some really innovative stuff with G+ and video we can all learn from. The way they’re incorporating current trends to develop their blog and what they’re doing is revitalising.

I feel our industry is constantly evolving and that we are constantly evolving with it; this can only be a good thing

I guess the one thing I learned at Blogstock is individually and collectively we are on the right path, that our industry is constantly evolving and that we are constantly evolving with it.

Years ago, I would have questioned whether this was possible. Now, I am happy to ride the wave with some of the most passionate people I know to see where it takes us.

Once again, into the rabbit hole we go.

Here are some of my favourite photos from Blogstock:

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Author

Macca Sherifi is a presenter, photographer and videographer who has worked in the travel industry for the past six years. He has travelled to over 75 countries, volunteered in Bangladesh and worked in both China and Australia.

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